450 Assisted Living Communities near Milwaukee

In the Milwaukee area, we found 450 Assisted Living Properties you might love. Also, there are 13 Independent Living Communities.

Harwood Place

Estimated $4,427/month
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8220 W Harwood Av, Milwaukee, WI
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Suite  ·  Studio  ·  One Bedroom
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Assisted Living  ·  Independent Living

Laurel Oaks

$3,990/month
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1700 W Bender Rd, Milwaukee, WI
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Suite  ·  Studio  ·  One Bedroom
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Assisted Living  ·  Independent Living  ·  Memory Care

Lamplight Inn Of West Allis

Estimated $5,695/month
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7400 W Greenfield Ave, Milwaukee, WI
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Suite  ·  Studio  ·  One Bedroom
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Assisted Living  ·  Memory Care

Village at Manor Park

Estimated $5,515/month Not Yet Rated
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3023 S 84th St, Milwaukee, WI
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Suite  ·  Studio  ·  One Bedroom
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Assisted Living  ·  Memory Care

Heritage 6 Llc

Estimated $3,688/month Not Yet Rated
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7901 W National, Milwaukee, WI
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Suite  ·  Studio
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Assisted Living

Lexington Heritage Heritage Assisted Living

Estimated $3,780/month
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5020 S 107 Th St, Milwaukee, WI
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Suite
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Assisted Living  ·  Board and Care Home

1 Helping Hands AFH, LLC

$4,530/month Not Yet Rated
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5277 n 29th st Unit 1, Milwaukee, WI
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Suite
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Assisted Living  ·  Board and Care Home  ·  Memory Care  ·  Respite Care  ·  Senior Services (Non Care Related)

Nehemiah House

Estimated $4,984/month Not Yet Rated
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3901 North 21 St Street, Milwaukee, WI
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Suite
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Assisted Living  ·  Board and Care Home  ·  Memory Care

Aegis Adult Family Home Llc

Estimated $4,004/month Not Yet Rated
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3408 S 1 St Street, Milwaukee, WI
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Suite
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Assisted Living  ·  Board and Care Home

Royal Care Adult Family Home

Estimated $4,876/month Not Yet Rated
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5829 N 60 Th St, Milwaukee, WI
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Suite
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Assisted Living  ·  Memory Care  ·  Board and Care Home

Alliance Adult Family Home Llc

Estimated $3,589/month Not Yet Rated
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6441 N 71 St Street, Milwaukee, WI
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Suite
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Assisted Living  ·  Board and Care Home

St Camillus

Estimated $4,462/month
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10101 W. Wisconsin Ave, Milwaukee, WI
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Suite  ·  Studio  ·  One Bedroom
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Assisted Living  ·  Independent Living  ·  Continuing Care Retirement Community(CCRC)  ·  Memory Care  ·  Respite Care  ·  Skilled Nursing Facility

Saint John's On The Lake

Estimated $4,640/month Not Yet Rated
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1800 N Prospect Ave, Milwaukee, WI
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Suite  ·  Studio  ·  One Bedroom
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Assisted Living  ·  Independent Living  ·  Respite Care  ·  Skilled Nursing Facility

United Community Center Adult Day Center

Estimated $4,568/month Not Yet Rated
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1028 S. 9th Street, Milwaukee, WI
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Suite  ·  Studio  ·  One Bedroom
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Assisted Living  ·  Memory Care

Watertower Assisted Living

Estimated $4,181/month Not Yet Rated
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2425 N Lake Dr, Milwaukee, WI
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Suite  ·  Studio  ·  One Bedroom
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Assisted Living  ·  Memory Care

What is Assisted Living?

Assisted living is a kind of residential care that many seniors choose, where they can count on 24/7 help with medication, eating, bathing and other activities of daily living (ADLs). Residents in assisted living enjoy a great measure of privacy and independence while getting the help they need with daily chores.

What Services are Available in Assisted Living in Milwaukee?

Services available in assisted living communities in Milwaukee can vary by size and location; however, here are some general services available at most assisted living near you:

  • Assistance with activities of daily living
  • Medication management
  • Security & supervision
  • Basic housekeeping
  • Daily meals
  • Health and exercise programs
  • Transportation

Milwaukee's assisted living communities offer comfortable living options for seniors who need some help with their ADLs but who can take their medication without monitoring and still enjoy a measure of independence. Local communities usually offer residents their choice of private or shared housing, thrice-daily meal service and complimentary transportation to and from doctor visits. Many extend this service to no-cost rides anywhere their residents need to go, such as shopping and day trips into town.

Communities vary in the services they offer, but many operate additional facilities at different levels of care where seniors with memory issues are more closely attended, as well as physical therapy gyms for residents recovering from hospital stays. These memory care and skilled nursing services are often provided as close as possible to the assisted living community to provide a continuity of care for seniors.

Getting Ready to Move to Assisted Living in Milwaukee

Moving into assisted living is a big step for most seniors, as well as for the families they love, who may have been taking care of them in their own home for some time. The adjustment is easier if you start planning well in advance. This most often starts with a visit to the doctor for a checkup. At the visit, the doctor performs the usual physical, but they may perform some specialized neurological checks to make sure assisted living is the right level of care for the senior.

With a green light from the doctor, most seniors and family members start looking for a community several months before their target move date. It takes time to find the ideal place, and it's a good idea to invest a day or two in personally visiting the final few locations to talk with staff and other residents. During this time, many people start moving their property into storage, at least temporarily. Most communities have all the necessities for furniture and other items from your home, and putting family photos, old books and your favorite chair in storage for a month or so makes for an easier move. Bulky things can be moved in later, when you know you're happy with your choice of community and that you have the space for them in your room.

Finally, most seniors and their families have to (at least somewhat) adjust their finances. Living alone or with family and a caregiver are not necessarily cheaper than assisted living, but they're almost never the exact same price. For a senior on a fixed income, it might take several weeks to withdraw funds from a retirement account or adjust the way a pension is paid to cover the new costs of living.

How Much Does Assisted Living Cost in Milwaukee?

The average monthly cost of assisted living in Milwaukee is $3,934 according to the Genworth Cost of Care survey 2017.

Assisted living in Milwaukee has costs associated with it that are in keeping with national averages. Across all facilities, the average price of a month in assisted living here is $3,934, which is only slightly higher than the national median of $3,750 a month. For that price, standard services include staff assistance with ADLs, meal service and whatever community events the facility has to offer. Prices rise a bit for premium services and resort-style communities, though more basic care can usually be found in town for below-average cost.

Our local Seniorly Partner Agents often have the ability to negotiate monthly rent and fees on your behalf at many of the communities you might be interested in.  This is a free service to you.  To connect to a Seniorly Partner Agent email us now at ask@seniorly.com or call (866) 855-4515.

What’s the Difference Between Assisted Living vs. Other Senior Care Types?

The difference between assisted living and other types of long-term care is that assisted living is placed on the continuun of care between independent living and skilled nursing facilities, sometimes called nursing homes.

Aging citizens in Milwaukee have several options for finding the best level of care for their physical and mental conditions. There's often some overlap in levels of care, depending on how specific properties are structured, but in general, your options are grouped into five discrete categories:

  • Independent living: These communities house seniors who don't require medication monitoring or help with ADLs. 
  • Assisted living: This is the most basic level of residential care, and it's preferred by seniors who can still function the way they used to, but who need some help with ADLs.
  • Skilled nursing: Skilled nursing homes have nurses on staff to monitor medication for their residents, as well as nurses' aides to help with cleaning and transporting residents. This level is appropriate for many disabled adults.
  • Post-acute care: This is usually a temporary option for people recovering from surgery or a fall, and after getting the physical therapy they need, most residents of post-acute care return to their old communities.
  • Memory care: Memory care provides very close supervision and engagement between staff and residents, most of whom have moderate or advanced Alzheimer's disease or dementia.
  • Hospice: Hospice facilities provide comfort care for people with end-stage illnesses, who generally need pain management and close medical supervision.

Helpful Apps and Websites for Assisted Living in Milwaukee

As much as an assisted living community does for you, there's always more to be done. These helpful apps can be downloaded to your mobile device, and all provide some helpful service specifically for Milwaukee residents that can make things easier than ever before for you or the senior you care for:

  • Medwatcher was developed in association with the FDA to help seniors troubleshoot their medical equipment. With this app, you can file reports of malfunctions, upload pictures to help diagnose the problem and automatically receive safety alerts to stay on top of recalls and use issues others have run into with their wheelchairs, walkers, pacemakers and other durable medical equipment.
  • OurTime is an over-50 dating and singles app that connects Milwaukee's seniors with each other for companionship, romance or one-off strolls in the park. The app is available for Windows and Mac, as well as through the company's website.
  • The Milwaukee AARP has a unique program for seniors who would like to stay mentally active in their retirement years: free college. Working in conjunction with the University of Wisconsin, this program allows aging citizens over 60 to audit university classes for free at any of its 26 campuses statewide.

Resources for Caregivers in Milwaukee

Taking care of dependent seniors is one of the most rewarding parts of volunteer and family life. Even the most diligent caregivers, however, sometimes need help with the job. These resources are available in the Milwaukee area, and they can be a real lifesaver for the caregivers who aging citizens depend on for so much:

  • The Alzheimer's and Dementia Alliance of Wisconsin offers training and support to caregivers in the state who are looking after seniors with cognitive issues. Through the group's website, caregivers can join support groups, engage in advocacy for senior issues and the rights of the disabled, and ask for guidance, training or placement at workshops held around the area.
  • Interfaith Older Adult Programs is a local seniors' group that tries to help caregivers with training and support. The group also provides temporary respite care at its facilities in Milwaukee, which can be located through the group's website.The Family Caregiver Support Network (FCSN) offers caregiver support services to anyone in the state of Wisconsin who provides assistance to aging and disabled adults. The network advocates for seniors and their caregivers in legal and legislative settings, provides training and community connections for caregivers, and operates a network of regional online message boards caregivers can post to for advice and support.

Government Resources for Seniors in Milwaukee

Milwaukee is the largest city in Wisconsin, as well as the seat of Milwaukee County. Both the state and the city offer plenty of resources for seniors:

The State of Wisconsin offers multiple resources through its Department of Health Services, many of which can be accessed through its website. Here, you can get information and statistics about senior issues in the state, read official reports, find referrals to local assisted living (and other levels of care) properties, and find links to other helpful resources outside of the local government.

Milwaukee County offers a unique program for its aging citizens; dotted around the area are several senior dining halls, where local seniors can stop by for a meal and good company with others in their age group. This is a fantastic opportunity to meet up with other active adults and spend some time making new friends and catching up with folks you already know. These facilities don't stop at just meal service; they also offer classes and community events for Milwaukee's seniors.

Milwaukee Demographics

Milwaukee's senior population made up 13.2 percent of the city's residents in 2017. The U.S. Census Bureau has predicted increases in the senior population across the board, as baby boomers continue to reach retirement age at a rate of 8,000 people a day nationwide.

Milwaukee Weather

Milwaukee is part of the northern Midwest, and it's close enough to water to get a strong lake effect off Lake Michigan. As a result, this city enjoys very mild summers and brisk winters. Average daily highs in Milwaukee reach 55.4 degrees Fahrenheit, while the yearly low temperatures average out at 40.1 degrees. Milwaukee gets roughly 121 days a year of precipitation, which comes as rain in the summer and snow in winter.

Transportation in and Around Milwaukee

Seniors who need a ride in Milwaukee often use the local public transportation authority, Milwaukee County Transit System (MCTS), to get around. This service operates a number of fixed bus routes to most parts of the city and its suburbs, as well as dial-a-ride services for riders whose communities might not offer complimentary transportation of their own. All vehicles are equipped to transport riders with disabilities, and connections are available to nearby networks that can take you as far south as Chicago. Seniors over age 65 enjoy a discount on MCTS, which can be loaded onto 1-, 7-, and 31-day passes at the reduced rate.

Fun Facts About Milwaukee

  • Milwaukee is a city of museums. No fewer than 17 full-size museums dot the city's River Walk area, and 25 more can be found in the outskirts.
  • One of the town's museums is an American original: Milwaukee is the site of the only officially recognized Harley Davidson museum in the world, commemorating the birthplace of the iconic brand.
  • The Rockwell Automation/Allen Bradley Clocktower in Milwaukee holds the world's second-biggest four-faced clock. The clock's faces are even bigger than those on the Elizabeth Tower (which houses Big Ben) in London.

Milwaukee Hospital Information

As Wisconsin's largest city, Milwaukee has some of the best health care and hospital options in the state. U.S. News and World Report, which provides definitive rankings for medical centers, has named Aurora St. Luke's Medical Center as its number-one pick for the best hospital in the city. This medical center is nationally ranked in five specialties, and is considered "high-performing" in six more, plus nine adult medicine fields. Close behind are Froedtert Hospital and the Medical College and Ascension Columbia St. Mary's Hospital Milwaukee.

Assisted Living Community Ratings, Inspection Reports and User Reviews for Milwaukee

Milwaukee County regulates assisted living in the area through the Milwaukee County Department on Aging. This body tracks resident concerns and complaints and enforces legal guidelines for care set by the Wisconsin State Department of Health Services. All residential care communities in Wisconsin must be licensed and are subject to inspection by state and county authorities.

The Wisconsin Better Business Bureau lists hundreds of assisted living properties in the state, including in Milwaukee itself. Issues relating to specific communities can be found on the BBB's website, along with notes from residents and families who've been to the facilities. You can also view any unresolved complaints from the BBB's website.

It's a good idea to get as much information as possible about a community before shortlisting it for an onsite visit. To learn more about an assisted living property before you visit, you can read what others have to say about their time there on Yelp or other local review sites.

What Questions Should I Ask When Touring Assisted Living Facilities in Milwaukee?

When touring assisted living facilities in Milwaukee, it's important to ask these 10 questions:

  1. Do the staff members speak your or your loved-one’s language fluently?
  2. Are background checks performed on staff members?
  3. Is there a registered nurse, licensed vocational nurse or certified nursing assistant on staff? If so, how often?
  4. Is there staff available to provide 24-hour assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs) such as dressing, eating, bathing and toileting?
  5. Can residents bring their favorite chair or other furniture or large items?
  6. Is it possible to view all of the types of rooms available?
  7. Are residents permitted to keep food in their apartments?
  8. Are pets allowed? If so, what kind?
  9. Is housecleaning for personal living spaces included in the price? If not, what is the fee?
  10. Can residents lock the door to their units?

Usually, you only get a short time to tour the grounds, see the amenities and chat with people who know the property well, so you want to have a list of questions prepared in advance that can help you understand what it’s like to live there.